Two black holes were discovered alongside the Milky Way

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Two black holes were found in the “cosmic garden” of the Milky Way, one of which is only 38 million light-years from planet Earth and “They are like monsters hidden under our bed”, said one of the scientists.

NASA has discovered these two extremely massive black holes in the vicinity of our galaxy, the American space agency said Sunday in a meeting of the American Astronomical Society. The announcement came just a week after the Chandra Observatory team revealed the huge discovery of a “swarm” with thousands of black holes, all located in what is the largest concentration of these bodies ever observed.

According to all the data collected through the Nuclear Spectroscope (NuSTAR), one of these black holes is 170 million light-years away from the Milky Way, but the nearest one is only 38 million light years from our galaxy. Although they appear to be extremely long distances in astronomical measurements, this means that supermassive black holes are already located “in our cosmic garden,” as scientists describe it. Ady Annuar, one of the researchers, describes these black holes as being “monsters hidden under our bed”.

These black holes are located at the center of active galactic nuclei, extremely bright and energetic celestial bodies of the same family as quasars and blazars. We could observe them now, because the particles that make up these nuclei emit radiation across the entire spectrum of electromagnetic energy, making them extremely hot, as they are surrounded by a large cloud of gas and dust, it may be blocking the arrival of this Energy to us, thus making your observation more difficult.

Another team discovered that the nearest black hole has in its vicinity a galaxy with many newly born stars, are no more than five million years old, while the Sun is five billion years old. All this has caused doubt and confusion to scientists, how can stars continue to be born if the black hole sucks the cloud of gas and dust that is their cradle.

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