163 new species discovered in the Mekong region during 2015

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The Great Mekong, which follows the course of the river of the same name, located in Southeast Asia, is one of the most biodiverse regions in the world, but also one of the most endangered.

New records and 1 year of research and data collection have brought news to the world of plants and animals in the region.

For example, a rainbow-colored snake was found on the head, a gecko with horns, similar to a “dragon”. These are two of the 163 new species discovered in the Mekong region in 2015, the World Wildlife Fund said Monday.

The new species recently described during this year 2016 were first surveyed by scientists and include nine amphibians, 11 fish, 14 reptiles, 126 plants and 3 mammals, all found in remote areas of this region stretching across China, Burma, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. Indications given under the World-Wide Fund for Nature (WWF).

The findings published in a new report also include a variety of red-flowered banana found in northern Thailand, an orange frog found in Cambodia and Vietnam, and a pale-blue-skinned gecko found in Laos.

The Great Mekong, which follows the course of the river of the same name from the Tibetan plateau through Southeast Asia, is one of the world’s most biodiverse regions, which has been proven by the total of discoveries only in the year 2015, but also one of the most threatened by various development and poaching projects.

In a statement, the WWF warned that the area is under “unprecedented pressure” of development, threatening the survival of the natural spaces that make it unique and its biodiversity.

The data and species of fauna and flora discovered throughout 2015 were studied, analyzed and cataloged this year, and WWF hopes to be able to continue the search for new species of both plants and animals, as this region still has a lot to offer.

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